Author Archives: Donna Guardino

Kim Murton, Cathie Joy Young & Devin Bernard

MAIN GALLERY

ARTISTS TALK: Saturday, February 11 @2pm

The title that Kim Murton and Cathie Joy Young have chosen for their February show is “Totems and Echoes”.

Kim Murton "Big Scream" ceramic

Kim Murton “Big Scream” ceramic

Kim Murton is a ceramic artist. For this show she wanted to make BIG pieces and then decorate them with pattern and sgraffito. “I like the idea of taking simpler forms and then accenting the shapes with illustrated features. I draw everyday so incorporating 2D designs on a 3D shape is a fun design challenge. I start with sketches but I don’t follow them exactly allowing myself to make decisions as I work. I often see what influenced me after a piece is finished. In this case, working on this body of work started in November, it’s pretty clear that the results of the election seeped into my subconscious in the form of the “Big Scream” piece. I countered this with the “Lotus Head” to try and regain some balance. I am hoping that people experience both humor and outrage when viewing the work.”  

 

Cathie Joy Young "Fugue" acrylic on wood panel

Cathie Joy Young “Fugue” acrylic on wood panel

Cathie Joy Young paints in acrylic on wood panels. “Figures and animals are symbolic in my work, and I feel like my imagery comes from borrowed memories remembered, not literally, but it is a way I explain it to myself. I’ve had an idea to paint imagined portraits of the ancestors I’ve uncovered thorough my genealogical research, but I am not organized enough to do so. However, the idea of this comes up now and again in these paintings, imagined ancestors and totems to those families I am, or may be, descended from. An echo is time travel. You make a sound in the present that you will hear in the future as the original sound you made becomes the past. My painting “Fugue” makes me think of music and echoes, visually and audibly, and reminds me how everything I do in art echoes something I’ve done with painting previously, or ideas I’ve immersed myself in, books I’ve read, and so on. So in that respect, my paintings have a long past, and a future, as long as they are seen.”

 

FEATURE AREA

Devin Bernard "Cosmic Circus" painting

Devin Bernard “Cosmic Circus” painting

Devin Bernard’s paintings are concerned with providing a strict order to his compositions.  Colors, textures and form are repeated throughout to keep the eye moving around the picture and to pull the composition together.  “Painting to me is a passion that gives meaning to my life.  It is my way of trying to explore the deepest mysteries:  what we are, how do we know and love each other, and why we even exist at all. My paintings are an expression of what it’s like to be human.  All my pictures contain representations of people because there is no “reality” without a human presence to give meaning to the universe.  These people are anonymous since I’m not interested in representing individuals.  They are, instead, archetypes that express philosophical ideas concerning identity, time, memory and the difficulty that we have in understanding and relating to one another.”

Willamette Tapestry Artists & Patrick George

Main Gallery
Ten artists from Willamette Tapestry Artists will be showing a wide variety of tapestries. Particpating artists: Janet Christensen, Kiki Dembrow, Janet Dorow  Barbara Hitzemann, Sandy Kennard, Kevynne Layne, Natalie Novak, Phoebe McAfee, Terry Olson and Pam Patrie. The group formed from weavers from the Damascus Fiber Arts school. Tapestry is a form of textile art, traditionally woven on both vertical and horizontal looms. Tapestry is weft-faced weaving, in which all the warp threads are hidden in the completed work, unlike cloth weaving where both the warp and the weft threads may be visible. In tapestry weaving, weft yarns are typically discontinuous; the artisan interlaces the coloured weft back and forth in its own small pattern area to create the image. According to Phoebe McAfee “There are many approaches of techniques to creating a tapestry; traditional European, Aubusson, Navajo.  It is a basic simple method of weaving, but the creativity comes to life in the imagery. ” The contempoart element comes to play in work such as Terry Olson’s piece about her grandparents, “The Milkmaid and the Boss”.  Olson teaches at the Damascus School and is a board member of the American Tapestry Alliance, the largest tapestry organization in America. The Willamette Tapestry Artists seek to promote understanding and appreciation of both the art and craft of contemporary tapestry.

Phoebe McAfee

Phoebe McAfee

Terry L Olson

Terry L Olson

Terry L Olson

Terry L Olson

 

Kiki Dembrow

Kiki Dembrow

Sandy Kennard

Sandy Kennard

Natalie Novak

Natalie Novak

Babara Hitzemann

Babara Hitzemann

 

Feature Area

Patrick George “Doric Electrication” intaglio

Patrick George, a printmaker will have intaglio and letterpress prints. His work is influenced by hisbackground in architecture. He traces his inspiration for printmaking back to Parmigianino, the Italian Mannerist painter, whose invention of the technique of etching led him into alchemy.  “I trace my interest in bookmaking back to Vitruvius, whose illustrations in his ten books on architecture have never been seen and so persist through time as enigmas.  I believe in the depth and elusiveness and layering of meaning, and I encourage the viewer to create new interpretations through subtle suggestion and the destabilization of signification.” Patrick is an architect who has practiced printmaking at the Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture and the University of Pennsylvania, and bookmaking at Sterling Type Foundry and the San Francisco Center for the Book.  He currently works out of his studio in the evening shadow of Mount Tabor with a Sturges etching press and Vandercook proof press.

16th annual Little Things

Sixteen years of Little Things! Artwork 7″ and under.
The premise for this show is simple: We asked artists to submit work that would fit into an imaginary cube that is 7″ X 7″. (And that includes the frame or stand) No other limitations. Every year is a surprise, with new artists added each year. One of our most popular shows.

Participating artists this year are: Diane Archer, Emilio Berwick, Scot Cameron-Bell, Beth Collins, Dayna Collins, Kurumi Conley, Ralph Davis, Patricia Donohue, Meg Dunne, Tamae Frame, Susan Freedman, Michelle Gallagher, Mar Goman, Denise Graham, Carolyn Hazel-Drake, George Heath, Iver & Jen Hennig, Robert Huff, Anya Jackson, Janet Julian , Alicia Justus, Gesine Kratzner, Mavis Leahy, Joanne Licardo, Mari Livie, Donna Mattson, Jill McVarish, Sylvia Miller, Lulu Moon Murakami, Kelly Neidig, Angela Neiwert, Cathi Newlin, Davis Nez, J Gail Owen, Dawn Panttaja, Janet Ronacher, Beth Robinson, Paul X Rutz, Kate Saunders, Suzette Shrider, Marcia T Smith, Amy Stoner, Mike Southern, Sally Squire, Mary Tapogna, Janet VanCleve, Tracey Waldron, Anna Wiancko-Chasman, Chayo Wilson, Kate Winfield, Samyak Yamauchi & Cathie Joy Young.

Kelly Neidig, paintings

Kelly Neidig, paintings

Anya Jackson, ceramics

Anya Jackson, ceramics

Sally Squire. ceramic/mixed media

Sally Squire. ceramic/mixed media

Robert Huff, photography on wood

Robert Huff, photography on wood

Mar Goman, mixed media

Mar Goman, mixed media

Janet van Cleve, mixed media

Janet van Cleve, mixed media

Gail Owen, beadwork on relief prints

Gail Owen, beadwork on relief prints

Jill McVarish

Jill McVarish

Alicia Justus, pencil, gouache

Alicia Justus, pencil, gouache

Susan Freedman, encaustic

Susan Freedman, encaustic

Anna Wiancko, ceramic, mixed media

Anna Wiancko, ceramic, mixed media

Mavis Leaahy, textile, stitchery

Mavis Leaahy, textile, stitchery

Lulu Moon Murakami, fiber

Lulu Moon Murakami, fiber

Denise Graham, acrylic paintings

Denise Graham, acrylic paintings

Samyak Yamauchi, paintings

Samyak Yamauchi, paintings

Dawn Panttaja, ceramic pots

Dawn Panttaja, ceramic pots

Ralph Davis, acrylic, gold leaf

Ralph Davis, acrylic, gold leaf

Kurumi Conley, fused glass

Kurumi Conley, fused glass

Marcia T Smith, ceramic sculpture

Marcia T Smith, ceramic sculpture

Angela Neiwert, ceramic wall art

Angela Neiwert, ceramic wall art

Sot Cameron-Bell, ceramic

Sot Cameron-Bell, ceramic

Cathi Newlin, ceramic sculpture

Cathi Newlin, ceramic sculpture

Dayna J Collins, cold wax, oil

Dayna J Collins, cold wax, oil

Emilao Berwick, ceramic sculpture

Emilao Berwick, ceramic sculpture

Paul Rutz,oil on wood

Paul Rutz,oil on wood

Tamae Frame, ceramic sculpture

Tamae Frame, ceramic sculpture

Kate Sauders, fused glass

Kate Sauders, fused glass

Kate Winfield, polymer clay, mixed media

Kate Winfield, polymer clay, mixed media

Davis Nez, Ink, gouache and encaustic on wood

Davis Nez, Ink, gouache and encaustic on wood

Michelle Gallagher, ceramic sculpture

Michelle Gallagher, ceramic sculpture

Janet Ronacher, cedar basketry

Janet Ronacher

Janet Julian, wood, mixed media

Janet Julian, wood, mixed media

Amy Stoner, encaustic

Amy Stoner, encaustic

Tracy Waldron, wood, mixed media

Tracy Waldron, wood, mixed media

Joanne Licardo, paintings

Joanne Licardo, paintings

Beth Robinson. mixed media digital

Beth Robinson. mixed media digital

Mike Southern, oil paintings

Mike Southern, oil paintings

Carolyn Hazel Drake, textile

Carolyn Hazel Drake, textile

Cathie Joy Young, acrylic, mixed media

Cathie Joy Young, acrylic, mixed media

Mary Tapogna, mosaics

Mary Tapogna, mosaics

Donna Mattson, mixed media, encaustic

Donna Mattson, mixed media, encaustic

Mari Livie fiber, stitchery

Mari Livie fiber, stitchery

Beth Collins, paintings

Beth Collins, paintings

Gesine Kratzner, mixed media clays

Gesine Kratzner, mixed media clays

Diane Archer, maps, mixed media

Diane Archer, maps, mixed media

Suzette Shrider, ceramics

Suzette Shrider, ceramics

Sylvia Miller, mixed media

Sylvia Miller, mixed media

Chayo Wilson, ceramic

Chayo Wilson, ceramic

George Heath, polymer clay

George Heath, polymer clay

Jennifer Hennig, ceramic

Jennifer Hennig, ceramic

Jennifer Hennig, ceramic

Jennifer Hennig, ceramic

Terresa White, Lynda Jikai Golan & Stacy Polson

MAIN GALLERY (October 27-November 19)

Terresa White "Woman transforming into bear" bronze & patina

Terresa White “Woman transforming into bear” bronze & patina

Terresa Michuar White is a sculptor working in bronze and clay. She is Yup’ik Eskimo and French Canadian, born in the Kuskokwim River region near what is today the Alaskan village of Bethel. Inspired by the art of traditional Yup’ik mask-making and arctic carvings, Yup- ik stories of transformation between animal and human, and Northwest Coast Native design, Terresa works with a locally-mixed, earthenware clay to create multi-media masks and an oil-based clay figures. Her work is contemporary, exploring traditional themes and their interplay. The faces of her masks and the gestures of her figures emerge from memories; those passed to her by her ancestors and her own. “They are shadowy and I sense them dimly until they appear, recognizable at last, through my working of clay. I am inspired by Yup’ik stories of transformation. My work transforms me, brings me closer to ways of knowing and to the Alaskan village life I left as a young woman.”

Lynda Jikai Golan "We Didn't Plan It" coffee, oil & water

Lynda Jikai Golan “We Didn’t Plan It” coffee, oil & water

Lynda Jikai Golan‘s medium is a mixture of coffee, oil and water. Trained as a painter and at UCLA, her work moved away from more traditional media when she became a resident at a Zen Center in Los Angeles. During that period, she became influenced by Sumi-e Ink Brush Calligraphy, and used it as a vehicle to speak to the themes she was most passionate about. “In this time of climate catastrophe and social upheaval, what is happening to our pale blue dot ?” Her images from the series, We Didn’t Plan-It, depict both chaos and pattern using spilt materials such as coffee, oil and water onto surfaces, bringing them into suggested, even familiar and pleasing forms, the unexpected and intentional always in relationship. My guide while working is to keep the designs vibrating between the raw material and my instant response, like the paintings of the great brush calligraphers, hundreds of years ago, whose work still vibrates with the intensity of split second decision.

FEATURE AREA (October 27-November 19)

Stacy Polson "Akiko and Simon" needle felted

Stacy Polson “Akiko and Simon” needle felted

Stacy Polson‘s medium is needle felting. Her work often gives the impression that one is viewing an illustration from a dramatically charged Japanese folk tale. Being a textile artist, she was naturally drawn to the beauty of kimonos and used their inspiration as a springboard to expand on their wildly clashing layers of color and graphics. Her medium, needle-felting (the act of interlocking fibers by stabbing them repeatedly with a barbed needle) allows her to paint or sculpt. And any encounter with fiber (natural or synthetic) raises the question: Can I felt this? Creating one of her wool paintings can take hours of work and literally thousands of stabs from start to finish, sometimes gently poking with a single fragile needle and other times pounding the canvas with scary, medieval looking tools.

Day of the Dead Group Show & Alisa Looney

MAIN GALLERY (September 29-October 23)

The Gallery will be celebrating our 10 year anniversary of the Day of the Dead group show. Over 50 artists will participate. Each year we ask artists to create art (colorful and otherwise) to commemorate our ancestors and departed loved ones. Lots to see from paintings, prints, wood, glass, ceramics and more!

J Gail Owen, linocut

J Gail Owen, linocut

Marcia T Smith, ceramic sculpture

Marcia T Smith, ceramic sculpture

Alicia Justus, gouache/penci

Alicia Justus, gouache/pencil

Cenya Eichengreen, beaded work

Cenya Eichengreen, beaded work

Dave Benz. walnut ink

Dave Benz. walnut ink

Beth Robinson, digital

Beth Robinson, digital

Mavis Leahy, fiber/stitchery

Mavis Leahy, fiber/stitchery

David Mylin, steel

David Mylin, steel

Ralph Davi, acrylic/gold leaf

Ralph Davi, acrylic/gold leaf

Cathie Joy Young, acrylic

Cathie Joy Young, acrylic

Cathi Newlin, ceramic

Cathi Newlin, ceramic

Samyak Yamauchi, acrylic

Samyak Yamauchi, acrylic

Carolyn Garcia, cut paper

Carolyn Garcia, cut paper

Dan Pillers, wood. mixed media

Dan Pillers, wood. mixed media

Jeannie Drevas, mixed media

Jeannie Drevas, mixed media

Chris Tymoshuk, cut metal

Chris Tymoshuk, cut metal

Jackie Hurlbert, ceramic, mixed media

Jackie Hurlbert, ceramic, mixed media

Denise Graham, mixed media

Denise Graham, mixed media

Jaclyn Evals, acrylic

Jaclyn Evals, acrylic

Dawn Panttaja, ceramic

Dawn Panttaja, ceramic

Kate Winfield, mixed media

Kate Winfield, mixed media

Christal Rothrock. drawing

Christal Rothrock. drawing

Marlene Robbins, ceramic

Marlene Robbins, ceramic

Amy Frazer, stitched thread

Amy Frazer, stitched thread

Robyn Williams, mixed media

Robyn Williams, mixed media

Stephanie Brockway, mixed media

Stephanie Brockway, mixed media

Paula Kjorlie, beaded necklaces

Paula Kjorlie, beaded necklaces

Amanda Myers, fiber, mixed media

Amanda Myers, fiber, mixed media

Betsy LeVine, painting

Betsy LeVine, painting

Dayna j Collins, mixed media

Dayna j Collins, mixed media

Shelly Caldwell, mixed media

Shelly Caldwell, mixed media

Janet Julian, mixed media

Janet Julian, mixed media

Mary Tapogna, mosaic

Mary Tapogna, mosaic

Kelly Phipps, cut metal

Kelly Phipps, cut metal

Meaghan Dunne, skull & mixed mediaMeaghan Dunne, skull & mixed media

Meaghan Dunne, skull & mixed media

Angel Salavec, mixed media

Angel Salavec, mixed media

Amy Storer, relief print & mixed media

Amy Storer, relief print & mixed media

Lulu Moonwood Murakami, mixed media

Lulu Moonwood Murakami, mixed media

Alex Bone, mixed media

Alex Bone, mixed media

Tara Murino-Brault, etching

Tara Murino-Brault, etching

Nikki Blackwood, mixed media in bottles

Nikki Blackwood, mixed media in bottles

Michelle Gallagher, ceramic

Michelle Gallagher, ceramic

Sigrid Casey, scanner print

Sigrid Casey, scanner print

Mike Wellins, cut wood & acrylic paint

Mike Wellins, cut wood & acrylic paint

Mark Clarson, Jill McVarish & Rogene Manas

MAIN GALLERY (August 25-September 27)

Jill McVarish "Goat Girl" oil

Jill McVarish “Goat Girl” oil

Jill McVarish is a classically trained painter. Her work is reminiscent of 17th century Dutch masters, with a contemporary twist in her choice of subject matter. The title her collection of work for her show is “Anthropomorphism”. It’s an exploration of the relationship between humans and animals. To quote Jill, “We keep them as pets and give them names. We catch them and house them in aquariums and zoos. We even dress them in costumes and put them to work. There is almost no part of the earth where animal life is not effected in some way by humans and it’s a vast subject, charged with a lot of moral questions. Though the issue of the responsibility we have to our animal friends looms in any exploration of this subject, these pieces are meant illustrate a few examples of the lighter side of this symbiotic co-existence.”

 

Mark Clarson "Hare" cast glass

Mark Clarson “Hare” cast glass

Mark Clarson works with cast glass. His work is mostly about allegory and desire. The animals are used as characters to illustrate an unknowable narrative. “I made the transition from metal working to glass casting as I was interested in working with light and color. I have been casting for over 20 years and glass casting is very similar to metal casting in many ways. The transition seemed organic to me. I am also using artificial light sources to illuminate the glass from within. This is a new technique for me and I have been very happy with the results. This technique has allowed me to use illuminated colors that emote a sense of vibrancy.” The process is a complicated one: Glass casting is the process in which glass objects are cast by directing molten glass into a mould where it solidifies. The technique has been used since the Egyptian period.

Rogene Manas "Garden of Eden" paper clay/paint

Rogene Manas “Garden of Eden” paper clay/paint

FEATURE AREA (August 25-September 25)
Rogene Mañas, painter and mixed media artist, has entitled her show “Bodies Of Work”. She has developed an art form of sculpting paper clay in bas-relief on canvases and panels. Her colorful work has a wood carved look that leaves people
wondering how it was made. Her rustic style has been deeply influenced by the folk art of Mexico and Latin America, as well as her Spanish/Italian heritage. She straddles the line between folk art and fine art and much of her subject matter focuses on nature and feminine forms as she weaves her personal story into her work. She has written a book about her innovative process for North Light Books called Artful Paper Clay: Techniques for Adding Dimension to Your Art, which she will debut at Guardino Gallery.

WINDOW : DAY OF THE DEAD PREVIEW WINDOW

This month we will feature a Preview Window for our big 10 Year Anniversary show in the Main Gallery, September 29-October 23. The Day of the Dead themed show will feature a variety of artist and mediums.

Ralph Davis

Ralph Davis

Robyn Williams

Robyn Williams

Marcia T Smith

Marcia T Smith

 

Reed Clarke, Alica Justus & Dawn Panttaja

MAIN GALLERY (July 28-August 23)
Artists Talk August 13 @2 pm

Reed Clarke "Always Ask More Questions" oil on canvas

Reed Clarke “Always Ask More Questions” oil on canvas

Reed Clark is painter and printmaker. His interest lies in the exploration of portraits and the figure, particularly in the expression of some level of human vulnerability that can only be half masked. His career spent in the field of psychology helped to focus his interest on the representation of persons as subject matter. Reed explains “I try to place subjects in the frame of a narrative arc that lead them to the moment depicted. Of course, I also want to manipulate the elements of line, color, surface texture, tone, shape, etc. for the pure enjoyment of doing so. In the end, I hope to elicit something in my work about being human that the viewer finds familiar and at the same time hard to put into words. If I’m successful, my work, like life, generates more questions than answers. Reed paints on canvas and typically starts a painting by working out much of the composition using acrylic paints to take advantage of their quick drying time. At some point in the process he shift to oil paints because he likes the way they move over the surface when painting and how they present opportunities for texture and color blending. He also works in the etching and monotype process. Each technique offers process and spontaneity, respectively.

 

 

FEATURE AREA (July 28-August 21)

Dawn Panttaja "Thee Denyce" ceramic

Dawn Panttaja “Thee Denyce” ceramic

Dawn Panttaja is a ceramic artist creating dolls/figures about the Portland cabaret scene of the early 90’s. She explains that Portland was home to a raucous, extravagantly fierce and unabashedly strange loosely knit group of musicians and performance artists. Performing every Sunday at the Satyricon, artists and audience shared nights creative chaos and sensual decadence. The only people recording these acts were the artists themselves. This show is in honor of those artists. “I hope to infuse my clay figures with the spirit of those folks who help turn Portland into a very fertile and wildly creative place. A “Paris of the ‘90s.” She works in a mid-range stoneware, using oxide washes and minimal glazes. Her use of a minimal color pallet was designed to turn her subjects into objects: icons of personalities who would have been more at home in dive bars and basement house parties than in museums. Says Dawn “Creating in clay is somewhat like performance art. You’re never quite sure how it’s all going to work out. Something can go terribly wrong… or right. Sometime what comes out of the kiln can far surpass anything I envision—or not. The ceramic artist deals in science, art and magic. The magic part is when you get lucky and everything works just the way you hoped it might.”

Alicia Justus "Buster and Anita" pencil & gouache

Alicia Justus “Buster and Anita” pencil & gouache

 

Alicia Justus primary medium is watercolor & gouache, but she enjoys sometimes using found mixed media, doing assemblages, and working with collage. Alicia is inspired by images from the past. She has “tried to give my pictures the look of an autochrome. First by drawing them out in pencil, and then coloring them in with gouache. I am a self taught artist who has been living in Portland for the last 20 years. I have written, illustrated, and self published tiny books during this time under the name of Red Star Art. I also have just had my first book professionally published recently through Show and Tell Press, a coloring book of silent film stars titled “Illuminating The Stars”. People are drawn in by the incredible detail and colors. Her work stirs emotions and calls to mind characters from the past, fairy tales, witches, and foreign places; they have a mysterious, dark, ethereal feel.

Betsy LeVine, Dennis Floyd & Jeanne Drevas

MAIN GALLERY (June 30-July 26)

Betsy LeVine "Before Me" oil

Betsy LeVine “Before Me” oil

Betsy LeVine paints in oils on birch panels. Her concept for this show, “Beauty Is Before Me”, concerning flora and mirrors. She carried a small circular pocket mirror and photographed flowers. As she puts it flowers discovering their own vibrant reflections. Betsy LeVine uses her attentive brushwork and keen eye for nuances in light and color to celebrate the natural beauty in the world around her. “When I wander through neighborhoods and on trails in the mountains, forests, and deserts, I find my gait slows and my eyes are ever dawn towards the intricacies in the plant life around me. It is as if the flowers, leaves and the play of sunlight through them are all calling to me, telling me to slow down, to just look and soak in the bountiful beauty in every moment. It feels like a joyous lifetime responsibility of mine to take on the role of a mirror for the quiet gorgeousness that surrounds us all the time, to not only reflect appreciation back to the planet for these gifts but also to recreate this beauty on a larger scale in hopes that it will allow others into this worthy world. “Beauty Is Before Me” therefore, it is also before you.”

Dennis Floyd "Rose Of Conversano" screen print

Dennis Floyd “Rose Of Conversano” screen print

Dennis Floyd is a screen printmaker who’s subject matter is also flowers. Screen prints are also known as silk screens or serigraphs. His colors are vibrant and intense. He works from his original drawings, paintings and compositions. Dennis does a color separation to make a unique color media matrix on his screens for each color. Then each color pass is printed by hand on his studio press. To achieve a full color print many colors are screened separately, making the process complex, with rich results. Creating art for Dennis is the metamorphosis from darkness and despair to light and happiness. To quote Dennis When I’m lost in my world creating art, I’m breathing in deep one of the most precious gifts that life has to offer and I am happy, powerful, invincible! The darkness in me is the farthest that it can be.

FEATURE AREA (June 30- July 24)

Jeanne Drevas "Bad Sex" skateboard/mixed media

Jeanne Drevas “Bad Sex”
skate board/mixed media

Jeanne Drevas creates sculptures out of surprising materials, she gleans materials that are all around her. For this show she has chosen to use skateboards. She loves the distressed graphics, the strength and beauty of skateboards, the life that these decks once provided to skateboarders and now she is seeing just what they offer to her. Skateboards were something I’d mostly seen at a distance, as they zoomed along under boys (mostly). But I’d seen enough close up to be fascinated by the distressed graphics on the undersides of the decks, the sides that get marred by all the attempts at curbs, stairs, railings and who knows what. I know, why not just paint a piece of flat plywood and cut it up. Maybe I will do that, but that does not have the feel of the immediacy of distressed decks and where they came from, the streets of any town or city. I’m honoring all those kids who didn’t know they were creating material for my new exploration. Jeanne was very drawn to the vessel form and that was the first, and most difficult objects she said made. She will also be showing wall assemblages, articulated figures, Miro-like standing sculptures, jewelry, even a wheeled pull toy.

xxxxxx

MAIN GALLERY (June 30-July 24)

Betsy LeVine "Before Me" oil

Betsy LeVine “Before Me” oil

Betsy LeVine paints in oils on birch panels. Her concept for this show, “Beauty Is Before Me”, concerns flora and mirrors. She carried a small circular pocket mirror and photographed flowers. As she puts it “flowers discovering their own vibrant reflections.” Betsy LeVine uses her attentive brushwork and keen eye for nuances in light and color to celebrate the natural beauty in the world around her. “When I wander through neighborhoods and on trails in the mountains, forests, and deserts, I find my gait slows and my eyes are everrdrawn towards the intricacies in the plant life around me. It is as if the flowers, leaves and the play of sunlight through them are all calling to me, telling me to slow down, to just look ansoak in the bountiful beauty in every moment. It feels like a joyous lifetime responsibility of mine to take on the role of a mirror for the quiet gorgeousness that surrounds us all the time, to not only reflect appreciation back to the planet for these gifts but also to recreate this beauty on a larger scale in hopes that it will allow others into this worthy world. Beauty Is Before Me .therefore, it is also before you.”

Dennis Floyd "Rose Of Conversano" screen print

Dennis Floyd “Rose Of Conversano” screen print

Dennis Floyd is a screen printmaker who’s subject matter is also flowers. Screen prints are also known as silk screens or serigraphs. His colors are vibrant and intense. He works from his original drawings, paintings and compositions. Dennis does a color separation to make a unique color matrix on his screens for each color. Then each color pass is printed by hand on his studio press. To achieve a full color print many colors are screened separately, making the process complex , with rich results. Creating art for Dennis is the metamorphosis from darkness and despair to light and happiness. To quote Dennis “When I’m lost in my world creating art, I’m breathing in deep one of the most precious gifts that life has to offer and I am happy, powerful, invincible! The darkness in me is the farthest that it can be.”

FEATURE AREA (June 30-July 24)

Jeanne Drevas "Bad Sex" skate board/mixed media

Jeanne Drevas “Bad Sex”
skate board/mixed media

Jeanne Drevas creates sculptures out of surprising materials. She gleans materials that are all around her. For this show she has chosen to use skate boards. She loves the distressed graphics, the strength and beauty of skateboards, the life that these decks once provided to skate boarders and now she is seeing just what they offer to her. “Skate boards were something I’d mostly seen at a distance, as they zoomed along under boys (mostly). But I’d seen enough close up to be fascinated by the distressed graphics on the undersides of the decks, the sides that get marred by all the attempts at curbs, stairs, railings and who knows what. I know, why not just paint a piece of flat plywood and cut it up. Maybe I will do that, but that does not have the feel of the immediacy of distressed decks and where they came from, the streets of any town or city.  I’m honoring all those kids who didn’t know they were creating material for my new exploration.” Jeanne was very drawn to the vessel form and that was the first, and most difficult objects she said made. She will also be showing wall assemblages, articulated figures, Miro-like standing sculptures, jewelry, even a wheeled pull toy.

 

Karen Croner, Gay Freeborn, Kelli MacConnell & Yelena Roslaya

MAIN GALLERY (May 26-June 28)

Karen Croner "Hear that?" mixed media sculpture

Karen Croner “Hear that?” mixed media sculpture

Karen Croner creates mixed media animal sculptures. Her current work is inspired by old folk tales and fables. Each piece is her interpretation of forces and emotions that drive those stories: mystery and menace, loyalty and betrayal, mischief and humor. Karen’s one-of-a-kind sculptures begin with a wire armature and papier-mâché. She uses paper clay, fabric, plaster, and acrylic paints to create unique textures and features. As Karen puts it, “The tension between these humble materials and my ultimate vision for each piece — that’s what motivates me to explore and innovate. Trying new things, pushing and refining what I’ve learned over many years keeps me passionate about the work.”

Gay Freeborn "Confidante" oil on canvas

Gay Freeborn “Confidante” oil on canvas

Gay Freeborn will be presenting oil paintings of animals and their relationship with man and each other. She has two series: Love Story and Odd Couples. In Love Story the human/animal bond is explored. It is beyond images. It can only be described as love in it’s completely unconditional, trusting form. To quote, “These paintings portray the intimate conversation between species; the human offering a safe place to rest and trust shown through the eyes of the creatures in their arms.” The Odd Couples concept began while walking in the woods with a pair of dogs, oddly matched as friends because of their size difference. It evolved into small daily paintings of animals I put together just for the fun of it. The possibilities are endless! “But in all of my work, I try to notice those unexpected things that occur when paint is applied to canvas. That might be the color I didn’t expect to pick up from my pallet but just works at the time or the spaces surrounding the subject which is as interesting as the subject. When I “stir the pot” in the painting process it all comes down to ingredients. the concept, the composition, the colors, and the medium.

FEATURE AREA (May 26-June 26)

Kelli MacConnell "Hazelnut Orchard" relief print

Kelli MacConnell “Hazelnut Orchard” relief print

Kelli MacConnell’s current body of work focuses on the expansive, diverse environment of the Pacific Northwest landscape. MacConnell’s chosen medium is linocut, relief printmaking. She explores the outdoors with careful observation, translating her natural surroundings into richly detailed linocut prints. Her relationship with nature and love of the outdoors is the inspiration for her work. She captures the essence of the majestic trees ever present in the landscape, whether they cling to a high cliff beside a waterfall, form soft, serried ranks in a quiet orchard, or provide a leafy framework to an industrial structure. The story of her experience unfolds as she carves into the block, leaving the raised, un-carved areas to represent a mirror image of the final composition. She prints mostly with black oil-based ink, with a minimal use of accent colors. With the simple use of contrast and minimal color, as well as line manipulation, “I strive to create exhilarating compositions inspired by the natural world.”

 

Yelena Roslaya "Untitled" ceramic sculpture

Yelena Roslaya “Untitled” ceramic sculpture

Yelena Roslaya creates exquisite ceramic donut configurations to explore with glazes and the sculpture form. The donut shapes are slip-cast and are stacked vertically to pour crawling glaze experiments on them. To get such astounding variation, she adds color pigments to different crawling glaze recipes. Other times, she paints a donut glaze test with an underglaze color first and then pours white crawling glaze on top. She prefers contrast between a subdued color and the white crawling glaze to make the surface pop on the form. Sometimes, Roslaya fires her forms several times before getting the desired result. She places each donut in gesture form to show personality, communication, and relationship between her small sculptures. Even though they are simple, their glaze and personality show otherwise. They may be leaning against each other or having a casual conversation. Whatever it is, can be up to the viewer’s imagination.