Category Archives: Past Shows

Here we showcase artists that have shown here at Guardino Gallery.

Brad McLemore, Reed Clarke & Ralph Davis

April 26-May 29
Reception Thursday, April 26, 6-9 pm
Artist Talk: May 19th @2 pm

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Brad McLemore "Bear Up" ceramic

Brad McLemore “Bear Up” ceramic

Brad McLemore’s ceramic works are made of stoneware and porcelain clays imbued with ash and atmospheric deposit—a record of the several days-long firing in wood-fueled kilns. A trust in formal strategies guides his choices in the composition of these pieces—activating interest or rhythm in a form through repetition and variation of elements; the tactile quality of surfaces.”In this work, I offer a fiction of hand-hewn conviction and archaic engineering—perhaps a fragment of a greater, discarded system—a relic of industry and discovery. The object is organized to implicate utilitarian reasoning, yet a certain awkwardness of form offers ambiguity of purpose, at best. Vaguely familiar structures provide some clue to the reasoning within, yet coarse materials and an aging firing process erode our certainty.”

 

 

 

 

 

Reed Clarke "I Can Help" oil

Reed Clarke “I Can Help” oil

Reed Clarke is a oil painter who concentrates on faces and figures. “The question of what it means to be human haunts me and forces its way into my work. On the one hand, I want to portray people in order to show their unique presence, but also to somehow allude to the underlying mystery of what it means to be human. The idea of having a human subject and the discipline that imposes on the composition of a work is something I value. Once a painting is begun I’m soon lost in the actual process of the interplay of color, line, volume, value and other visual challenges that must be dealt with before the finished painting begins to emerge. In the end, I hope for a balance between the subject of the painting and actual quality of the paint on the canvas. I hope to create in the viewer a desire to continue to experience the painting over time, as with someone who he or she feels they would like to know better.” 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FEATURE AREA

Ralph Davis "Pleiades" acrylic

Ralph Davis “Pleiades” acrylic

Ralph Davis is a painter who is interested in the combination of the hard-edged otherworldly formality of the geometric figure with the less formal organic soft-edges of the natural world. Ralph explains “This tension between the soft form and the hard edge or the natural and the formal may be extended to a similar tension between the finite and the infinite, or, in Plato’s terms, the earthly realm of coming to be and passing away, and the eternal, unchanging realm of Forms. These geometric constructions often convey to me a sense of discovery, of being in the presence of something significant, or on the threshold of a complex realm of things not well understood. My intention has been to avoid cognitive contrivance and the domination of linear thinking and to elicit more complex responses on both a conscious and unconscious level.”  

Christopher B Wagner, Paul X Rutz, Amy Ruedinger & Stirling Gorsuch

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Christopher B Wagner "Blue Lean"

Christopher B Wagner “Blue Lean” carved reclaimed wood

 

 

Christopher B. Wagner creates figurative sculptures carved from reclaimed lumber. He has developed a personal style that uses lessons from folk art traditions.​ “I have long been interested in distorting the human figure. Changing proportions, stretching or squashing the form in order to evoke a base response from the viewer. The stylizations I use are intended to emphasize the spiritual or intellectual longings of humans. This can be seen in the elongation of limbs or the extending of necks meant to show a yearning to extend beyond ourselves.” Many of these gestures are borrowed from wide ranging religious traditions. Even the basic solitary presentation of each figure is more reminiscent of an icon than portraiture. “My sculptures begin with points of inspiration. These can drawn from my own imagination or specific references I encounter in the everyday world. Many of the carvings for this body of work were inspired by the distorting of a human figure’s shadow as the sun moves across the sky. I’ve taken pictures of these shadows and used them as the silhouettes of my solid wood carvings.”

 

 

 

 

Paul X Rutz "Portrait of Painters Workshop: Kitchen Utensils"

Paul X Rutz “Portrait of Painters Workshop: Kitchen Utensils” oil

Paul X. Rutz is a painter with a twist. He also carves the panels he paints on. “No matter what we do, we do it moving. Lately I’ve been borrowing sculpting moves from my collaborator, Christopher Wagner, carving into wood panel to distort the traditional rectangle that paintings usually occupy. By puncturing that rectangle, rounding its edges and adding to it here and there, I’m making something viewers can literally move around and animate with their own bodies, watching how the shadows shift on the wall in parallax behind the paint. Painting the warp in a glass or the way a t-shirt letter follows the folds is a kind of meditation on the warped, refracted funhouse world all around us.” Paul considers these paintings as carefully designed notes on what deserves extra attention. They help him see the found poetry when our scarfs or t-shirts hit the floor, the potential energy in clean kitchen utensils as we start a meal, or the story suggested by a napkin stuffed in a recently emptied wine glass. I love a good detail—even better, one that’s a little bent.”  

 

 

 

 

FEATURE AREA

Amy Ruedinger "Two Rivets" raised copper

Amy Ruedinger “Two Rivets” raised copper

 

Amy Ruedinger creates intriguing raised copper vessels and forms from a flat sheet of copper. “Hammering copper on steel with steel, I change a hard flat material into an inviting, touchable three-dimensional form. I try to pull out the ‘personality’ of the piece as it slowly develops. Top/bottom, visible/invisible, inner/outer are dualisms that appear in my work. A few of my pieces are made from old copper etching plates. The image mostly gets hammered away but it adds an invisible history, surface texture, and former idea within the piece. Lately, I’m pulling out 3-Dimensional dots from the sides of my bowls-influenced by a polka dot begonia!”

 


 

 

Stirling Gorsuch "End of Summer"

Stirling Gorsuch “End of Summer” relief & monoprin

 

Stirling Gorsuch is a printmaker working in a variety of techinques, noticably, relief printing and monotype. His recent work documents the changing landscape in areas which have been affected by recent wildfires. He often goes hiking in the Cascades and the Gorge, bewildered by how fire has reclaimed these areas in dramatic new ways. For Stirling, these altered landscapes serve as poetic symbols of transformation, and the enduring quality found in the natural world. The inherently slow process of relief printing and monotype forces him to be methodical as he builds up each printed layer. Many of these prints are made over weeks, sometimes months at a time, making his process somewhat self-reflective. “Like reading a journal from the past, my work is a record of my present-day focus and admiration of the world I occupy.”

Rodney C Stuart, Kelly Neidig & Nanette Wallace

February 22-March 27
Artists Talk: Saturday, March 17, starting at 2 pM
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Kelly Neidig, Rainbow Clouds" watercolor & Flashe

Kelly Neidig, Rainbow Clouds” watercolor & Flashe

Kelly Neidig is an abstract painter who works from the memories of places she has lived and traveled. Her new work is inspired by a recent trip to Japan and uses abstract imagery based on everyday encounters in the natural world. Reflecting on the mindfulness that Japanese embrace in their every day life, Neidig approaches these new pieces slowly and by “stopping and listening to my work.” “In Japan I was very influenced by the art of Yayoi Kusama. I loved investigating her technique of layering lines, marks, and dots to create negative and positive space in her paintings. I was also drawn to traditional Japanese calligraphy and and was surprised to notice how each artist has a specific style of mark making that is uniquely their own.” Neidig is fascinated with the the combination art and nature, and of ancient traditions and modern technology in Japan. To create her paintings she first draws rough digital sketches on her phone using a drawing ap. She recreates the digital drawings using a combination of Japanese watercolor and Flashe paint which she applies to the canvas with Sumi brushes she purchased in Japan. “I adopted the practice of digital sketching because I often find myself inspired to create art when I am away from my studio.  Since I always have my phone on me, the drawing ap is the perfect tool.  I love using my finger to draw on the screen and create digital brush strokes then returning to my studio and recreating those strokes with the Sumi brushes.” 

Rodney C Stuart, wood/mixed media

Rodney C Stuart, wood/mixed media

Rodney Stuart creates wood/mixed media sculptor. “Wood has always been a material that I have been drawn to.  In Taiwan where I was an art teacher I collected flotsam and jetsam on the beaches from the annual typhoons. A large amount of that wood was from old fishing boats that were destroyed by the storms. In the Gorge I gather driftwood from storms and branches from my property. I am attracted to how the weather and the aging process have created a patina of colors on materials.” Mannerism in all things living has always fascinated him. Heads and portraits are probably his favorite subjects. “I lean more towards simplicity of mannerism and story line as well as the use of simple materials to create the right face or head.  I like creating heads that have some sense of evil, good and fun. I identify more with folk and funk art points of view, which demonstrate more the artist’s lives, personalities and experiences. My point of view is a sense of humor, senselessness and autobiographical references. I also like a sense of ambiguity and an unlikely mixture of materials and techniques. With my own work I am going back to the characters I read about in books as a child, international toys or things I have picked up from my dreams. I see my role more as a jester, shaman or storyteller. I try to place an importance on play, openness, humor and simplicity. In these creations I have tried to connect with my childhood, which has been a powerful source for my art. Making objects provides me with a way to impact people both through teaching and being a creative individual!”

FEATURE AREA

Nanette Wallace, "Until I Gain Control" monotype

Ff Nanette Wallace, “Until I Gain Control” monotype

Nanette Wallace work is gestural and energetic, consisting primarily of monotypes with a focus on the figure. She often incorporates a limited color pallette on her monotypes consisting of black or sepia ink. This allows her to find purity in the imagery without relying on color to convey mood and emotion. A large component for the inspiration in her work is derived from black and white photographs from the early 1900s through the 1960s. She uses these photos as a starting point, often combining multiple images to create one figure and ghosts of previous figures to inspire the next. While her work has a lyrical quality to it, she is most interested in the viewer finding their own story in her work. Nanette’s Monotype prints are created by inking the entire surface of a smooth plexiglas plate with etching ink applied via a roller. Then using rags and q-tips, ink is removed from the plate to create a subtractive image, e.g. creating lights from a field of opaque color. The image was then transferred onto a sheet of paper by pressing the two together using a printing press. Monotype printing produc- es a unique singular print; most of the ink is removed during the initial pressing. Although a subsequent reprinting is sometimes possible, it differs greatly from the first print. These secondary prints from the original plate are called “ghost prints”.

Susan Opie, Bryn Harding & Nancy Abens

January 25-February 20
Artists Talk: Saturday, February 17, starting @ 2 pm
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Susan Opie "Dancing with a Frog" bronze

Susan Opie “Dancing with a Frog” bronze

Susan Opie will be showing her bronzes in a show she titles “Animals and Oddities”. “Early on I made abstract sculpture, but soon figurative elements crept in and then figurative took over. I am concerned with the story figurative tells but still remain interested in the way shape and space work together. My figures are often animals, sometimes human and occasionally inanimate objects. I like a sense of motion and action. My figures are doing things, sometimes at their own peril.” While there is often whimsy, especially with the Exquisite Corpse series, look for a darker undertone, of human world versus animal world, technology versus nature. Her process is to hand model the piece in wax, encase it in a ceramic shell mold, burn the wax out of the mold, heat bronze, pour into the molds, knock the molds off, finish and patina. The bronze she use is silicon bronze, a modern alloy formulated with the property of pouring very fine detail and used originally in manufacturing precise industrial components. This bronze is also corrosion resistant and, therefore, a good choice for outdoor installations. The downside is that it is a very hard bronze and the finishing work on the castings is time consuming and wears out tools. All of Susan’s sculptures are one of a kind.

 

Bryn Harding "Ryan" intaglio

Bryn Harding “Ryan” intaglio

Bryn Harding’s print series “Alone. Together.” is simultaneously a theoretical and intensely personal investigation into the impossibility and importance of the portrait. The images are all friends and family of the artist rendered through a combination of different print mediums that result in images that are at once specific and vague, highly rendered and flat and graphic. “The work is based on the belief that we are, each of us, infinite and unknowable–mysteries to ourselves and to those around us, and that the impossibility of ever fully understanding ourselves or others results in a universal sense of loneliness and isolation. These portraits challenge the idea of a core, innate and inexpressible true self which other portrait artist have spent their careers trying to capture. Instead they argue that what can be know of the other, or of ourselves, is only present in discourse, in a shared gaze, in the space in between rather than inside of people.” In a broad sense, Bryn has used the unique language and aesthetics of print mediums to explore the relationships between technique, craft and art, as well as the relationships between pictures, technologies and seeing. Ultimately, Bryn uses images as a way to process and understand himself, the world in which he finds himself and the people around him. 

 

FEATURE AREA

Nancy Abens "Old Roses and Hanoki Spray" photo transfer

Nancy Abens “Old Roses and Hanoki Spray” photo transfer

Nancy Abens uses photography to show the opulence and voluptuous nature of flower arrangements. The rich colors and textures of the backgrounds served as inspiration for these pieces. “I was given 3 calla lilies by a friend. I put them in a vase with a peony that I had  just cut from my garden and added a branch of barberry. It was so beautiful that I decided to photograph it. That was the starting point of this body of work.” She worked as a florist for nearly 12 years. “I thought I could start chronicling my garden by creating flower arrangements of what was blooming throughout the year. I have an abundance of subject matter! The finished mages were then transferred onto painted birch panels using a special transfer film and solution. I thought this technique would be a way to show the arrangements in a new way. I have always been drawn to the flower paintings from the 17th and 18th centuries. There is a beauty that is sensual, mysterious, and spiritual in a most profound way.” She uses photography and the camera as a tool for gathering images to create something else. “It is important to me to bring more beauty into this world. I try to do this through growing a lush garden full of flowers, appreciating the wonders of nature, and creating artworks to share that beauty and wonder with others.“

Jerri Bartholomew, Carol Chapel & Paul Griffitts

All the artists this month view the natural world through a scienticfic viewpoint.

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Jerri Bartholomew, "Under the microscope"

Jerri Bartholomew, “Under the microscope”

Jerri Bartholomew is a microbiologist who uses glass as her medium to explore the microbial world. To quote Jerri “In some ways, science is stripping away the layers to reveal what is beneath, while in art, I am building up layers to create something new. Both draw from a creative impulse, a desire to ask questions, to experiment, and to learn from trial and error.” She thinks of her art as collages in glass, combining photographic screen prints with free-form imagery, and using a variety of fusing and cold-working techniques. “In some of these pieces I portray microorganisms as I would see them under the microscope, and with the tools that we use to study them. I want the viewer to feel some curiosity about what they are seeing, but also to appreciate the beauty of things that they can’t see. To this day I rarely sit down at a microscope without uttering a silent “wow”, and I rarely open a kiln without a sense of anticipation at what I will discover.”

 

 

Carol Chapel, untitled drawing

Carol Chapel, untitled drawing

Carol Chapel’s drawings of the “Unseen Worlds” began when friend gave her a microscope. This series of drawings combines her curiosity of those seldom or rarely seen worlds that surround us with “my determination to do the best drawings I can. Paintings have the advantage of re-working. Drawings and prints, not so much. Drawings can be erased but there is something immediate about pencil or crayon on paper, left there. Untouched. That’s how it began. Looking really really close-up at random items. Random items evolved into specific items. I started a series of drawings I call Unseen Worlds. And then the bugs. Gasp! Bugs are complex and I must say, beautiful. I was hooked. These drawings are the bug part of the Unseen Worlds series. I hope I am communicating the essence of the insects I’ve drawn here. I’m no Entomologist. My enjoyment and fascination is discovering the complexity of these creatures. An insect that I would most likely brush aside, I now stop. I pause. There is a beauty there that I won’t quickly destroy. Also, the more I look and the more I see, the more I see that Nature is elegant as well as functional. I don’t find awkward lines in the wing of an Assassin Beetle. I hope there are no awkward lines in my interpretations either.”

FEATURE AREA

Paul Griffitts. "Destinations"

Paul Griffitts. “Destinations”

Paul Griffitts creates 3D fractal art, which has only been possible since 2009, representing the cutting edge of technology, mathematics, and art. These works are composed of 3d fractal building blocks–mathematical formulas–which I combine together in various ways to express “potentialities.” Since we recognize the beauty of fractals all around us in nature–e.g. ferns, flowers, sea shells, and mountains–these works have a sense of the familiar about them. Even though they may not exist in our reality, and indeed may appear somewhat strange, it’s not difficult to imagine them existing somewhere–perhaps in another dimension. “I prefer a direct head-on view of my “fractal accretions”; a viewpoint which tends to de-emphasize the 3d nature of the medium and results in a more traditional 2d image, albeit with telltale traces of the 3rd dimension.  The mathematical formulas are combined in such a way that they merge with other formulas, and take on some of their characteristics. The fundamental beauty of mathematics, as seen in nature, finds a new means of expression with the aid of advanced technology.”

17th annual Little Things

17th Annual LITTLE THINGS show.
November 24 to December 24
The ever popular Little Things group show is back for it’s 17th year. The premise for this show is simple: We asked artists to submit work that would fit into an imaginary cube that is 7″ X 7″. (And that includes the frame or stand). No other limitations. Every year is a surprise, with new artists added each year. The show is geared to holiday sales.  The buyer will be able to carry their artwork out at the time of purchase.  The show you see on the first day will not be the same show on the last day, as artists bring in new work or simply sell out as the show progresses.  This is a great opportunity to “Give the Gift of Art” at affordable prices by local artists as holiday presents or to decorate your own special corner or cubbyhole (that “little” spot in your home).  A wide variety of mediums will be represented: paintings, clay, fused glass, encaustic, wood, photography, fiber art. polymer clay and mixed media.

PARTICIPATING ARTISTS
Nancy Abens • Diane Archer • Emilio Berwick • Stephanie Brockway • Scot Cameron-Bell • Beth Collins • Dayna Collins • Kurumi Conley • Rosie Covert • Ralph Davis • Patricia Donohue • Susan Freedman • Michelle Gallagher • Hazel Glass • Mar Goman • Denise Graham • Veronica Guzman • George Heath • Jen Hennig • Robert Huff • Anya Jackson • Janet Julian • Alicia Justus • Erinn Kathryn • Gesine Kratzner • Mavis Leahy • Celeste LeBlanc •  Joanne Licardo • Mari Livie • Donna Mattson • Virginia McKinney • Maggie McOmie • Norma Morrell • Lulu Moon Murakami • Kim Murton • Kelly Neidig • Cathi Newlin • Colleen OHair • Gail Owen • Dawn Panttaja • Janet Ronacher • Paul X Rutz • Kate Saunders • Suzette Shrider • Amy Stoner • Mike Southern • Sally Squire • Consu Tolosa • Janet VanCleve • Tracey Waldron • Christopher B Wagner • Anna Wiancko • Chayo Wilson • Steve Winkenwerder • Samyak Yamauchi • Cathie Joy Young

Rosie Covert

Rosie Covet

Mike Southern

Mike Southern

Gesine Kratzner

Gesine Kratzner

Cathi Newlin

Cathi Newlin

Beth Collins

Beth Collins

Janet Ronacher

Janet Ronacher

Ralph Davis

Ralph Davis

Kurumi Conley

Kurumi Conley

Consu Tolosa

Consu Tolosa

Paul X Rutz

Paul X Rutz

Veronica Guzman

Veronica Guzman

Mavis Leahy

Mavis Leahy

Cathie Joy Young

Cathie Joy Young

Christopher B Wagner

Christopher B Wagner

Jennifer Hennig

Jennifer Hennig

Dayna Collins

Dayna Collins

Scot Cameron Bell

Scot Cameron Bell

Colleen OHair

Colleen OHair

Kim Murton

Kim Murton

Hazel Glass

Hazel Glass

Anya Jackson

Anya Jackson

Robert Huff

Robert Huff

Nancy Abens

Nancy Abens

Norma Ann Morrell

Norma Ann Morrell

Dawn Panttaja

Dawn Panttaja

Joanne Licardo

Joanne Licardo

Diane Archer

Diane Archer

Lulu Moon Murakami

Lulu Moon Murakami

Emilio Berwick

Emilio Berwick

Janet VanCleve

Janet VanCleve

Steve Winkenwerder

Steve Winkenwerder

Samyak Yamauchi

Samyak Yamauchi

Tracey Waldron

Tracey Waldron

Mari Livie

Mari Livie

Carolyn Hazel Drake

Carolyn Hazel Drake

Denise Graham

Denise Graham

Gail Owen

Gail Owen

Sally Squire

Sally Squire

Anna Wiancko Chasman

Anna Wiancko Chasman

Erinn Kathryn

Erinn Kathryn

Susan Freedman

Susan Freedman

Patricia Donohue

Patricia Donohue

Maggie McOmie

Maggie McOmie

Kate Saunders

Kate Saunders

Chayo Wilson

Chayo Wilson

Suzette Shrider

Suzette Shrider

Amy Stoner

Amy Stoner

Janet Julian

Janet Julian

Donna Mattson

Donna Mattson

Kelly Neidig

Kelly Neidig

Celeste LeBlanc

Celeste LeBlanc

Virginia McKinney

Virginia McKinney

George Heath

George Heath

Michelle Gallagher

Michelle Gallagher

Alicia Justus

Alicia Justus

Deborah Unger

Deborah Unger

Stephanie Brockway

Stephanie Brockway

 

David Nez, Dan Pillers & Linda Robertson

October 26-November 19

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David Nez "Sol Omnia Regit" gouache, pen & ink, found paper collage, encaustic & oil paint

David Nez “Sol Omnia Regit” gouache, pen & ink, found paper collage, encaustic & oil paint

 

 

David Nez creates detailed and inticate paintings. “My recent series of paintings is entitled Terra Incognita, a term used in cartography for regions which have not been previously mapped or documented. In these paintings I explore imaginal landscapes inspired by ancient and modern cartography, inhabited by a mythic cast of characters enacting cryptic narratives. The imagery is drawn from different historical periods and sources: renaissance era maps and alchemical illustrations, tarot cards, zoological and herbal books, scientific diagrams, 20th century dictionary illustrations, clip art, etc. The paintings are hand rendered on 300 lb. printing paper or birch panels, using gouache, pen and ink, found paper collage, encaustic wax and oil paint .”

 

 

Dan Pillers

Dan Pillers

 

 

Dan Pillers assemblage work is based on the notion of Art as Artifact. The materials he uses are, for the most part, recycled and salvaged goods… artifacts if you will. For me these elements add a heightened sense of history. They are familiar elements that when placed together create a beautiful object thats approachable. Etched glass and a purposeful use of text are subtle whispers that invite the viewer in closer to discover its deeper meaning. The impetus for my art varies with each piece. My inspiration comes from a variety of, random, seemly unrelated things. It can be a play on words, a news article, or a pair of shoes left on a curb. I find I have three basic stages of creativity that follows. The first is the conceptualization.  I dream my work, build it in my mind, and sketch out rough rudimentary drawings. I have a pretty good sense of what it will look like before the actual production begins. Then I go into what I call my hunter gather mode. I search out elements for each piece. Once I’ve gathered the raw materials the construction begins.”

 

 

Linda Robertson "Growing Brave" encaustic

Linda Robertson “Growing Brave” encaustic

 

 

FEATURE AREA
Linda Robertson creates imagined landscapes in encaustic with lush botanical forms and vibrant colors reminiscent of places shes lived like her childhood home in Hawaii and her current home in the Pacific Northwest. Her work pairs modern materials with ancient technique to produce a luminous surface that captures and reflects light. Working with encaustic wax I layer hot beeswax, pigment and resin together, adding and subtracting layers until I get the look I want.As she explains No other type of painting offers such a unique combination of depth, luminosity and texture. The translucency of the wax creates layers of information, like the sediment of time, while stirring the senses of sight, smell, and touch.

Day of the Dead (with Mavis Leahy in the Feature Area)

September 28-October 22
We will be celebrating, in the unique Portland style, 11 years of the Day of the Dead group shows at the Gallery. Each year we ask artists to create art (colorful and otherwise) to commemorate our ancestors and departed loved ones, including pets. Over 48 artists will participate. There will be lots to see from paintings, prints, wood, ceramics and more! 

Mavis Leahy will continue the Day of the Dead theme with her show in the Feature Area. She works with fiber & mixed media.

Artists: Dave Benz, Alea Bone, Stephanie Brockway,Tory Brokenshire, Shelly Caldwell, Scot Cameron-Bell, Dayna Collins, Ralph Davis, Jeanne Drevas, Cenya Eichengreen, Jaclyn Evalds, Amy Frazer, Michelle Gallagher, Mar Goman, Denise Graham, Kim Hamblin, Bill Horgos, Rebecca Hubbs, Jackie Hurlbert, Janet Julian, Alicia Justus, Celeste LeBlanc, Wendy Malinow, Virginia McKinney, Sylvia Miller, Lulu Moon Murakami, Tara Murino-Brault, Kim Murton, David Mylin, Amanda Myers, Cathi Newlin, Gail Owen, Dawn Panttaja, Stan Peterson, Kelly Phipps, Marlene Robbins, Frank Salcido , Amy Stoner, Mike Wellins, Anna Wiancko, Robyn Williams, Chayo Wilson, Kate Winfield, Karen Wippich, Samyak Yamauchi & Cathie Joy Young.

 

Beverly Soasey, Beth Robinson, Scot Cameron-Bell & Sue Thomas

Beverly Soasey "The Prize" Mixed media assemblage

Beverly Soasey “The Prize” Mixed media assemblage

ARTISTS TALK (Saturday, Sept 16 @2 pm)

MAIN GALLERY (August 31 September 26)
Beverly Soaseys art falls in the category of mixed media/assemblage, which for her means, anything goes. There are no boundaries, no formal rules on execution of materials. In a blending of objects and media, assemblage invites exploration and experimentation. It is completely suited to her collective nature, where I can do whatever it takes to express an idea, evoke a mood or convey a concept. My work is a study of textures, patterns and colorthe combination of elements that intrigue and surprise the viewer. This process begins with the search and ends in a story. I love going to that unknown place and surprising myself with the result.Theres always that moment when I know a piece is  finished, but until that moment, I have no clue when it will happen. My studio is overgrown with stuff: hundreds of objects, photos, books, bird wings, scraps of metal and ideas saved in various forms.There are boxes full of secrets and boxes waiting to be filled. Assemblage requires having inspiration and ideas around all of the time, always invading my thoughts.These thoughts and ideas come together in a single statement. Like my obsession for collecting, traveling and exploring, my art becomes a part of that process.   

Beth Robinson "Queen of Empty Coffers" digital collage

Beth Robinson “Queen of Empty Coffers” digital collage

Beth Robinson is an artist, art conservator and conflict resolution specialist. She records the intellectual and emotional responses to the process of bereavement by utilizing letterpress printing techniques, conservation methods, collage, digital imaging and collecting ephemera and paper. This recording of mourning started when she was eight, after her grandfather died unexpectedly. The adults around her were openly heartbroken at his unexpected death. Even in their shock and awkwardness, they had the forethought to provide her with magazines, glue, and adult size scissors to make collages. She learned to be fully present in those sobering moments of youthful innocence about death and refused to lose a sense of wonder. This art practice cultivated an outlet for the unique conflicts change and loss prompt. Over a five-year period starting in 2005, three of her grandparents, her father, youngest brother, and mother died. These consecutive deaths gave a deeper awareness of societies awkward handling and lack of support for grievers with unspeakable emotions. She is an advocate for grieving well through her art and meditation practice by companioning other grievers through the reality of loss.

 

FEATURE AREA (August 31 September 24)

Scot Cameron-Bell "Vase" ceramic

Scot Cameron-Bell “Vase” ceramic
cerami

 

Scot Cameron-Bell, caramic artist, entitled her show: Vases With The Same DNA. To quote Scot, “Yes, I dream about pots. I still have that anticipation upon entering my studio ready to work. Its all about changing. I continue to explore altering shapes for my vases.  My fat pots became wider. I made tiny vases with very tall handles. Now, I make tall vases with fat handles. I put a lot of consideration into the heavily decorated surfaces of smiling birds in conversation and imaginary flowers to invite the eye to focus on the shape of those vases.” The dynamics in the differences between small and large works lured her to start creating a relationship between her vases. She incorporates a variety of similar surface decorations and colors on large and small vases with the goal of having a family of vases with the same DNA. “Those silly cone shaped handles and feet make an unusual family relationship for every vase.” Scots vases are wheel-thrown, altered, and stretched.

Sue Thomas "Apron" oil

Sue Thomas “Apron” oi

 

Susan Thomas paints aprons as whimsical creatures flying through the clouds, holding apron strings in friendship, or using their pockets for birds. An antique apron from her Mom with its history of good food started this journey. Her apron paintings show the creative stitching women added to their homely aprons–she used antique aprons from a collector as her models. The brightly colored aprons in oils on canvas or Oregon birch wood carry memories and a bit of Disney

Shannon Weber, Chi Meredith & Michael Kurz

MAIN GALLERY (July 27-August 29)

Shannon Weber "Amulet" Paper, encaustic, hemp, found objects, hag stone

Shannon Weber “Amulet”
Paper, encaustic, hemp, found objects, hag stone

 

 

Shannon Weber works in 3D fiber sculpture. Her organic vessels and assemblages use a mixture of techniques from stitching, cold connections, weaving in multiple layers. Shannon sees every material as an option and is fearless about the collection of those materials. “By applying ancient techniques and transitioning to contemporary designs, I can achieve my desired effects by using a mixture of repetitive layers, weaving, stitching, cold connections, painting, and encaustic. These multiple applications make it very easy to blend metal, wire, coastal debris, rubber, and organic materials of all kinds. Each layer of material, mixed with different techniques, begins to build a  structure that gives the objects and vessels their form and opens doors for detailed surface design embellishments. My attraction to working with Fiber is with the options it presents in its ability to shape-shift when using a variety of reclaimed materials and found objects.”   

Chi Meredith "Oval" acrylic painting

Chi Meredith “Oval” acrylic painting

 

 

 

Chi Meredith abstract paintings are developed in layers. She begins a painting by drawing lines and forms with a charcoal pencil directly on the canvas. Next she paints the areas to fill in the design and cover the whole area of the canvas. Then she begins over-painting and scraping the surface, adding texture using lines, dots, and abstract shapes. Meredith uses color to differentiate shapes and areas, and to enhance the image. As she explains “Eventually the surface develops depth, giving glimpses into the previous layers. I am seeking an image that conveys contrast between organic and geometric elements of design.  I want the complexity of the painting to draw the viewer in close. My background in math and science related disciplines has influenced the non-objective direction of my artwork.”

 

Michael Kurz "Grow Rings" Oil on Panel

Michael Kurz “Grow Rings”
Oil on Panel

 

FEATURE AREA (July 27-August 27)
Michael Kurz has titled his show “Borders”. He investigates boundaries and markings that divide one space from another. “Within this theme, I am interested in exploring when one thing becomes something else, like how a line on the ground can determine where we can and cannot park and then another line on the ground determines our citizenship.” Kurz explains that his interest in this theme started as a reaction to the border wall proposal in US presidential politics, but he expanded the concept during a flight from Mexico to the US. “I got an aerial view of the land below and I saw this patchwork of farms, residential areas, commercial areas and then I also saw how oceans, rivers, and mountain ranges cut through all of these distinct lines that humans make. It made me want to scrutinize what a border is.” He applies his painterly sense of exploration and improvisation to the work, meandering between abstract and representational painting. A sense of wonder and discovery drive the artist to experiment continuously.