Monthly Archives: May 2019

Hickory Mertsching & Dan Pillers, Dave Benz

June shows (May 30-June 25)
Artist Talk: June 15th @ 2:00 p.m.
MAIN GALLERY

Hickory Mertsching is an oil painter concentrating in still lifes.  His painting tell a quiet contemplative story. “My medium of choice has always been oil paint, I find the modeling properties to be endless and timeless. My brushwork presentation ranges from forced illustrative techniques to loose impressionistic interpretation employing a limited palette with modest color schemes to create a harmonious picture plane. I also enjoy values.” Provincial influences and historical painting genres, such as Flemish still lifes are the inspiration for Hickory’s Paintings.

Dan Pillers art conveys social and political thought using a diverse range of available materials. Dan is intrigued with the notion of art as artifact and vice-a-versa.  Over the past several years he’s been creating “sculptural bricolage” as means to communicate his thoughts and feelings about the world in which we live.  He combines a variety of salvaged materials and artifacts as a form of personal storytelling.  By doing so he creates a sort of reliquary with an opinion.  The materials he uses are remnants of things gone by.  These add a level of familiarity as well as a heightened sense of history.   Through a painstaking process of deconstructing, reimagining, and assembling random objects Dan creates beautiful, yet provocative, works of art. 


FEATURE AREA

Dave Benz creates another world with his walnut in paintings. At first glance, the haunting paintings of Benz and Chang appear to be vintage sepia photographs. Upon closer examination, they reveal themselves to be walnut ink paintings rendered by hand on watercolor paper.  The figurative paintings portray mysterious narratives that are largely left to the imagination of the viewer. As an artist and collector of vintage photographs for decades, Benz wondered when his two interests would eventually meet, and was pleased when they finally did. The paintings utilize the image vocabulary of early 20th Century photographs, and they reward a second or third look with details that can be easy to miss.

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